P4rgaming Satire Essays

Satire Essay Topics List

According to the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, satire is defined as “humor that is used to make fun of and often show the weaknesses of someone or something.” Satirical or satire essays often make use of humor, irony, and hyperbole to poke fun or criticize an object or a person. A majority of these are aimed at politicians, particular events, or even celebrities. The purpose of writing a satirical essay is simply to entertain readers and therefore, topic selection is indeed critical.

Consequently, here are examples of satire essay topics you can consider when writing your essay:

  1. Increased fixation with social media platforms.
  2. Employment: The harder you work, the lesser the pay.
  3. The US government struggle to develop a new health care act.
  4. The federal budget and its flaws.
  5. Kevin Durant getting booed in return to Oklahoma.
  6. The rift between Dalai Lama and the Chinese government.
  7. Increased rate of teenage pregnancies.
  8. Workplace harassment.
  9. Sexual harassment in the workplace.
  10. Gender bias in the workplace.
  11. Problems the upper-class individuals face.
  12. Facebook and Instagram friends are the best.
  13. How to twist a lie and make it convincing.
  14. Why school is a waste of time.
  15. Video game skills should be considered during job interviews.
  16. Why the phrase “Any publicity is good publicity” makes zero sense.
  17. The recipe of being an annoying human being.
  18. How to change from an extrovert to an introvert.
  19. Special guidelines on how to fail in your exams.
  20. Do politicians tell lies?
  21. Why should the Avengers lead our troops in the fight against ISIS?
  22. Why I will hire Mike Ross and Harvey Specter as my lawyers?
  23. Do we really need gun control?
  24. Why global warming is simply a hoax?
  25. Advantages of being homeless.
  26. Do we really need the freedom of speech?
  27. Writing a movie review on a movie you have never watched.
  28. How to avoid getting punished even while you are on the wrong?
  29. How to pass your exams without studying?
  30. Reasons why dropping out of school is important for some people.
  31. Why it is important to have your teenager son/daughter as your financial advisor.
  32. Why you should be friends with your parents on social media.
  33. Why it is important not to ignore strangers.
  34. Reasons why some men should consider being stay-at-home dads.
  35. Why your pet will never assume the role of your best friend.
  36. What diseases has music really cured?
  37. If the ozone layer is depleted, what will we be left with?
  38. Who is the slave, man or technology?
  39. What should be the appropriate sentence or punishment for animal cruelty charges?
  40. What exactly is meant by the phrase “rat race”?
  41. Are rats also involved in their rat race?
  42. Reasons why girls workout more than boys.
  43. Eliminating currency can help solve the problem of lack of money.
  44. Why cars should be banned to help reduce air pollution.
  45. Why FIFA should make soccer watching illegal to avert the dangers of hooliganism.
  46. Food should be distributed according to a person’s body weight.
  47. Equal salaries are the only solution to help eliminate social prejudice.
  48. What will we do when the graves become overcrowded?
  49. Using illegal immigrants as free workforce can help prevent others from coming.
  50. Why TV shows currently make a strong case to be considered as babysitters.
  51. If you wake up as Kanye West tomorrow, would you remain married to Kim?
  52. As president for a day, which basketball game would you rush to watch?
  53. Each country should build a wall round its borders to help keep its people in.
  54. Is healthcare as complicated as the Republicans are making it to be?
  55. Will it ever be possible to assign one’s sleeping time to a robot?
  56. Should teachers be required to wear uniforms?
  57. How to win an argument with your girlfriend.
  58. How to break up with your girlfriend via social media.
  59. A guy’s hairdo advice for girls.
  60. Steps on how to be annoying on social media.
  61. How politicians lie and blame it on their duty to the citizens.
  62. Things to do to avoid getting into a relationship.
  63. What to do when your boss finds you mocking them.
  64. Ten reasons why brushing your teeth brings you closer to your grave.
  65. What are some of the problems that the working class individuals face?
  66. How to arrange and have an awkward date with your crush.
  67. Why Donald Trump is my hero.
  68. How not to do your chores.
  69. What to do when surrounded by zombies.
  70. If my identity is stolen, will I have a different face?
  71. How to always show up late for dates.
  72. How not to get asked what you are currently doing with your life.
  73. How aliens built the Great Chinese Wall.
  74. How to breakup with your girlfriend without talking to her.
  75. How to defeat terrorists by downing our fighting gear.
  76. How to be a nosy friend.
  77. Here are some of the real causes of global warming.
  78. Why I will be voting for Captain America as the 46th President of the United States.
  79. Why we need an off button for the Internet.
  80. Why conservative media houses should exclusively cover news regarding Trump.
  81. Google is indeed making us more knowledgeable and hard-working individuals.
  82. Why I prefer North Korea’s press freedom to ours.
  83. Why women lift heavier weights than men especially in the gym.
  84. Why recycling is the worst remedy for environmental pollution.
  85. Top 10 reasons why Russia is America’s closest ally.
  86. Reasons why Brexit is good for Britain.
  87. Five reasons why animals should have equal rights as human beings.
  88. Why deforestation must continue to help accommodate the surging number of people.
  89. Is capitalism the direct opposite of communism?
  90. Should people be forced into interracial marriages so as to help eliminate racial discrimination?
  91. Why Kenneth Bone became an Internet sensation during the presidential debate.
  92. Five reasons why President Trump was sniffing a lot during the debate.
  93. Why President Trump has the best temperament compared to a majority of former US presidents.
  94. Why President Trump is likely to deliver on all of his promises before his first 100 days in office are over.
  95. Why I prefer taking the trash out over all other chores.
  96. Why the barter system is better than the current monetary system.
  97. How students can experience a stress-free environment in college.
  98. How mathematics came to be my favorite subject in school.
  99. Why the government is right to infringe on our privacy.
  100. Where do all the mismatched socks disappear to?
  101. Some of the inherent mistakes within our families.

We are delighted to welcome a guest post from Dr Keith M Johnston, Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at the University of East Anglia and Ealing Studios expert.

In a 1954 press release promoting their forthcoming production slate, Ealing Studios heralded ‘the production of large-scale subjects, the majority of which will be in colour’.[1] This year would turn out to be the height of Ealing’s colour film production, an eclectic mix of four films including horse-racing drama The Rainbow Jacket (1954), African adventure sequel West of Zanzibar (1954), Hollywood satire The Love Lottery (1954) and Lease of Life, the Robert Donat-starring drama about a small village reverend who reassesses his life when he learns he only has a year to live. The film has particular resonance for being Donat’s penultimate film, and the only one he would make for Ealing: but it also has strong ties to the other films either side of it, most notably the reliance on a recognisable male star (Donat here, David Niven in The Love Lottery; Anthony Steel in West of Zanzibar), and the use of extensive location shooting (Epsom for The Rainbow Jacket; Lake Como for The Love Lottery; Kenya and Zanzibar for West of Zanzibar; the East Riding of Yorkshire for Lease of Life).

For modern viewers more used to the association of Ealing Studios with their succession of comedies from the late 1940s and early 1950s (the likes of The Lavender Hill Mob, 1949, or The Man in the White Suit, 1951), Lease of Life can be a challenging film: often slow-moving, episodic, and with a late narrative event that can feel out of keeping with the characters that have been built up throughout. Of course, only a third of Ealing’s output was ever purely comedic, but that is the picture of the studio that tends to dominate: alongside ideas of it as being cosy, whimsical and restrained. A safe piece of British cinema history, then: not rebellious like Gainsborough Studios, or the fantasies of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. Yet as Lease of Life proves, Ealing was more than capable of offering its own ‘mild revolutions’ (to use Michael Balcon’s phrase), its own small rebellions.

Robert Donat

Adrienne Corri and Kay Walsh

At the heart of Lease of Life is a simple story, and a simple man: Reverend William Thorne (Donat) is safe and predictable, a dull but loveable figure who bores the children in his small village church of Hinton St John and barely has money to support himself, his wife Vera (Kay Walsh) and daughter Susan (Adrienne Corri). Thorne is moral, abstemious and restrained, and Donat plays him with a world-weariness that is visible in his every action, but particularly in his lined and expressive face (while it is tempting to link Donat’s appearance here to his illness, as I did in an earlier blog post, Gill has pointed out that he was made-up for the role). Unbeknown to Thorne, he is being considered for a post at Gilchester Cathedral (he is invited to give a sermon to assess his potential) and, as his doctor soon reveals, he has around a year to live. The combination of those two events leads to the clash at the heart of the film, around the role of religion in an individual’s life (it is one of few Ealing films to directly engage with the religious) and the need to be honest, that life cannot be lived in the belief that simply sticking to the rules will make you a good person: “the important thing is not just to be good, but to be good human beings.”

This sermon is the big dramatic moment in the film, occurring around the halfway point, and marking Thorne’s move towards doing the ‘right thing’. Donat makes the most of the sermon, showing Thorne’s uncertainty as he chooses to ditch his safe and prepared speech and speak from the heart instead. It is a potentially showy moment for an actor, but Donat pitches it well, understanding Thorne is not grand-standing, but being open, honest, heartfelt. The film counterpoints the performance with some comic moments of editing: one of the schoolboys in the audience is shown hiding a copy of Alias the Saint inside his hymnbook, before he becomes more interested in Thorne’s words; equally, the shocked expressions on the senior members of the Cathedral and school, and the resigned quality of Vera’s face, are a useful balance to Thorne’s eloquence.

Thorne’s revolution then has to be seen as mild: from being a pushover, he now tells one of his parishioners off for being a spoilsport when she complains about the grave digger being drunk, and then agrees to look after money for Mr Sproatley (Beckett Bould) so it is away from the gold-digging hands of the much-younger Mrs Sproatley (Vida Hope). These are hardly world-shaking rebellions, but compared to Thorne’s normal behaviour, and taking into account the small village society, they are seen (and played) as major shocks to the safe, traditional world Thorne existed at the centre of. Yet the villagers also seem satisfied that Thorne has woken up in this way: we see several parishioners pleased to see energy and passion in their reverend, not the more standard cheerful resignation.

Yet while Thorne might struggle with his rebellion (he becomes the centre of attention for newspaper reports and scandal), the film ultimately supports his belief. The attitude of the scriptwriter (Eric Ambler) and director (Charles Frend) towards female rebellion is more complex: Mrs Sproatley has taken up with a young, handsome farmhand while her husband is dying, which is obviously not the ‘right thing’; Susan Thorne wins a piano scholarship to the London School of Music and threatens to run away if her parents don’t support her, yet the film cannot decide whether to make her strong, supportive or stroppy, often combining all three characteristics in one scene; while Vera Thorne is the calm, loving mother and wife who, in the third act, steals £100 of Sproatley’s money to pay for Susan’s new life. This has the potential to be the most shocking rebellion of all, yet the film struggles to justify or explain it: Vera is stressed and worried through the film, particularly after Thorne’s sermon and Susan’s news about London, but we don’t see her snap, or really understand the reasons for her out-of-character actions. Perhaps this is because the film tries to play it as a mystery – who could have taken the £100? – but there are no real suspects or tension here. Instead, it is left to Kay Walsh’s performance to try and make the fractured character beats coherent when Vera breaks down in front of Thorne, claiming she was practising what he had preached, aiming to do the right thing to give Susan the life she deserved. Unfortunately, the film backs away from the hysteria and rebellious nature of her actions to allow Thorne to prove himself as the stronger character, and act as a male provider for both the women in his life.

His solution is a curious one and, again, links the film to wider concerns in Ealing’s other films. Thorne chooses to abandon his principles around the hyperbolic media coverage of his ‘shocking’ sermon (which, to a modern audience, doesn’t feel shocking at all) and accept a commission from a national newspaper to write opinion pieces for them. This is a very different perspective on the media industries expressed in Ealing’s Meet Mr Lucifer (1953), which mocks the television industry and the spate of 3-D filming, or The Love Lottery, where David Niven is coerced and blackmailed by shadowy corporations (with fingers in many pies, but most of them include media). Thorne’s rebellion actually pulls him further into traditional ideologies of the mass media, and it is a decision he makes not because it is ‘right’ but because otherwise he will have to reveal his wife’s criminal action.

So, the film is a complex mess of morals and actions, not all of them coherent. Visually, it can be impressive, with bursts of colour throughout (although the Eastman Colour print has not aged well, with some noticeable fading of brighter hues throughout) – the blue skies of the East Riding dominate many of the scenes, the red book cover of Alias the Saint is a beacon amid the grey stone of the cathedral, and Adrienne Corri’s auburn hair and bright clothing often place her at the centre of this colour film (there is also a nice scene where she and Kay Walsh wear the same colours, although in different clothing styles: it is a brief visual reference to the maternal bond that will, later, lead Vera to steal the money).

Lease of Life is unlikely to challenge most people’s perceptions of what an Ealing Studios film can be, although it does point to many lesser-known dramatic films within their back catalogue. It is flawed and problematic (not least in its depiction of supposedly strong women) but fascinating and rich, particularly around the collision of religion, mass media and manufactured scandal. And at its heart lie committed performances from Donat, Walsh and Corri that struggle with the material, but provide the coherence that the film might otherwise lack.


[1] ‘Ealing Studios’ Production Plans for 1954,’ Ealing Studios Cuttings File, BFI collections.

© Keith M. Johnston, all rights reserved.

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Sadly, ‘Lease of Life’ is not currently available on DVD, but we hope this situation will change, and that the BFI will consider showing it as part of their Ealing retrospective later this year.

Tags: Adrienne Corri, Ealing Studios, Kay Walsh, Lease of Life, Robert Donat

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