Wileyplus Assignment 0 Answers To Interview

Questions

Overview

In Questions, you are able to view, edit and delete questions for your assignments. Actions that are available depend on the source of the question; for example, you may edit and delete questions that you created not edit or delete WileyPLUS questions.

 Additionally you may create Questions and Question Pools which you may then assign to your class sections from the Select Questionstab inCreate New Assignment.

In the Assignment tab, click Questions, and the Questions page appears.

Find Questions

The questions that are available to include in assignments are listed together by chapter for each course. To view the available questions use the scroll boxes in the Find Questions section to sort the questions based on Chapter, Level and Source, and then press Go. The page populates with a list of questions that fit your criteria.

Question List

In the Question list page, you are able to preview a question and view its properties, view questions that are associated with Learning Objectives, or use the Create New Question button to create a new question. To return to the Find Questions page, click Find More Questions.

Preview Question

To preview a question in the list click it's name or select Preview from the Actions drop-down menu and click Go. The question appears in a browser window.

Question Properties

To view the properties of a question in the list, select Properties from the Actions drop down menu and click Go. The Properties page appears. You may click Preview to preview the question, or Cancel to return to the Questions list page.

Create New Questions

To create a new question to assign to your students, click Create New Question. The Describe Question tab appears.

Describe Question Tab

In the Describe Question tab, define the type of question, the WileyPLUS course material it is to be associated with, the study objectives (if any) the difficulty level, and whether you wish to share the question with other instructors or not.

Question Type

Select one of the six different question types that are available WileyPLUS:

  • True-False - A  question with two possible answers, answered by choosing by selecting a radio button.

  • Multiple-Choice - A problem statement followed by a number of preset choices to be selected by the student using radio buttons.

  • Text-Entry - A problem statement followed by a field for a text answer.

  • Text-Entry Numeric - A problem statement followed by a field for a numeric answer. Significant Digits and Tolerance controls can be set on the answer.

  • Essay - A problem statement followed by a text box. This question type requires instructor grading.

  • Survey - A problem statement followed by five preset choices to be selected by the student using radio buttons.  This question type requires instructor analysis.

Associate With

Select a chapter with which to associate this question from the scroll-box. This allows you to organize and later find this question for inclusion in an assignment. It also defines which chapter is available for the Link to Text feature.

Difficulty Level

Select Easy, Medium or Hard to describe your question.

Source and Date of Creation

A record of who created the question, andwhen the question was created.

Sharing

Select whether or not you would like to share this question with other instructors in your master course.

After you have made your selections, click Next, and the Question tab displays.

Question Tab

Each of the six question types available in the Question Type drop-down menu in the Describe Question tab provides a different interface for authoring the question in the Question tab.

True False Question
  1. For True/False questions, in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions.

  2. For Choices, the text boxes for the possible answers have True and False as defaults. However, you can add more text if required. Select the radio button next to the answer that the system should mark as correct.

  3. In the Feedback sections you have the ability to display text as a part of the confirmation a student receives after attempting a question, e.g., if you enter: This is an anaerobic system in the feedback field for the incorrect choice, students will receive the following message:"Incorrect. This is an anaerobic system."

  4. Use the Up, Down, Remove links to change the order of the possible answer choices or to delete.

Multiple Choice Question
  1. For Multiple Choice Questions,in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions.Use the Question text field for the full text of your problem statement.

  2. For Choices the text boxes for the possible answers are provided in the left hand column. To add choices click on Add Choice. You can also add "None of the above" as a possible answer choice by clicking on the checkbox.

  3. Be sure to select the radio button next to the answer that the system should mark as correct.

  4. Use the Up, Down, Remove links to change the order of the possible answer choices or to delete.

Text-Entry Question
  1. For Text Entry Questions,in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions. Use the Question text field for the full text of your problem statement.

  2. Type the Answer- Use this field for the full text of the answer. The answer that the student provides must match this field identically to be marked as correct. Be sure that you have appropriately capitalized the answer and that the spacing and spelling are correct.

  3. For Correct and Incorrect Feedback, you have the ability to provide feedback based on whether the student answers the question correctly or not.

Text-Entry Numeric Question
  1. For Text Entry Numeric Questions,in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions. Use the Question text field for the full text of your problem statement.

  2. Type the Answer- Use this field for the full text of the answer. The answer that the student provides must match this field identically to be marked as correct. Be sure that you have appropriately capitalized the answer and that the spacing and spelling are correct.

  3. In the Units field specify the units, if any, that you wish the answer to be in. Leave blank for no units.

  4. Tolerance - Specify the amount of tolerance, if any, that you wish to allow in student answers.

  5. Significant Digits - If the question supports Significant Digits, specify how many significant digits are expected in student answers.

  6. For Correct and Incorrect Feedback, you have the ability to provide feedback based on whether the student answers the question correctly or not.

Essay Question
  1. For Essay Questions,in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions. Use the Question text field for the full text of your problem statement.

  2. No answer is recorded for Essay type questions because they require manual grading by the instructor.

Survey Question
  1. For Survey Questions,in the Question tab enter a question title, and question text.Choose a name for the question that will help you select it from a list of questions. Use the Question text field for the full text of your problem statement.

  2. No answer is recorded for Survey type questions because they require analysis by the instructor.

After you have created any of the questions above, click Next, and the Question Assistance tab appears.

Question Assistance Tab

  1. Use the fields in the Question Assistance tab to describe the question assistance that you wish to associate with this question. (Note: you make question assistance available to students when you create an assignment. See theSet Question Policies section in Create New Assignment for more information).

  2. In the Hint field, enter any text that you want to make available to your students that may provide a reasonable hint to the correct answer.

  3. In the Solution field, enter the text that describes how to arrive at the answer. Please note that only standard text is available at this time.

  4. Under Link to Text you can select one or more sections from the e-book, based on your choice of the chapter associated with this question,

Confirmation Tab

  1. The Confirmation tab allows you to review all of the details that you previously entered for the question. To make changes, use the Back button to navigate to the appropriate section.

  2. If all details are correct, click Finish to save and return to the question list, or Create Another Question to save this question  begin the process for creating another new question.

Assign a New Question

To assign a new question to your class, go to Assignments and clickCreate New Assignment. Your question will be available in the Select Questions tab.

 

 

 

For any job interview, the overarching point you want to get across is why the prospective employer should hire you. The interview is your sales pitch that you are the ideal candidate for the job at hand. It is also a get-to-know-you conversation to show the company staff that they would enjoy working with you. So make your case and be likeable! Here are 11 questions to practice:

How much do you make?

This won’t be your opening question but you can count on compensation coming up early in the discussion. The company doesn’t want to waste its time if it turns out they can’t afford you. If you currently make more than the role advertises (for example, you are making a career change from a high-paying job) then focus on what you’re targeting for this role, so you can let them know that, yes, they can afford you. If you have been underpaid and don’t want the company to think they can get you cheaply, also focus on what you’re targeting for the role so that you keep the focus on the role at hand and not your low compensation. But you want to have something to say confidently and directly when the money talk comes up – don’t just wing it.

Tell me about yourself.

This also might be phrased as “Walk me through your resume” or “Walk me through your career” or simply “Why should I hire you?” It’s a common opening question where you get to summarize your background in order to point out the most relevant skills, expertise and accomplishments that make you the best hire. That second part is key – you want to highlight the relevant aspects of your background. You’re not just talking about yourself in general – that’s a date, not an interview.

What is your biggest strength?

Ideally you have already enumerated your strengths as you introduce yourself. But you may get a pointed question that asks you to choose one (or more) to specifically focus on. Pick your most relevant strength(s) for the job. Then give a specific example for each so that the interviewer can see exactly how your strength manifests itself in the workplace.

What is your biggest weakness?

On the flip side, you may get asked about your weaknesses. Here you pick a weakness that is NOT relevant to the job so that it’s clear it won’t impede your ability to perform. You also want to give a specific example to make crystal clear to the interviewer what you mean by your weakness, so that the interviewer isn’t left to imagine and possibly over exaggerate how bad the weakness might be.

What is your biggest accomplishment (or biggest mistake)?

Related to the strength/ weakness line of questioning, you may be asked for an accomplishment, or on the flip side, a mistake. While the strength or weakness is a quality or a skill, the accomplishment or mistake is an outcome that happened. Despite the subtle difference, this type of question should be handled similarly – pick an accomplishment relevant to the job and pick a mistake that isn’t so critical.

Give me an example of __________ (where BLANK is a key function of the potential job)

This line of questioning draws directly from the job description for the role you’re interviewing for. If a key part of the role is direct marketing, the employer may ask for an example of a successful email campaign. If the job requires managing a team, the employer may ask about your management experience and style. Go line-by-line through the job description and be prepared to give an example for each and every requirement.

Read Next: 5 Interview Mistakes You Don’t Know You’re Making

Why do you want this job?

In addition to whether or not you can do the job, the employer will want to know that you want to do the job. Your motivation is very much under scrutiny in the interview process so you should have a genuine and excited response for why you want this job.

Why did you leave your last job?

Another way to gauge your motivation is by looking at past transitions. Why did you leave other jobs? Why did you make the career choices that you made? You will most probably be asked about your most recent job, but you may also be asked about every career decision you made. The interviewer is looking for what draws you toward and away from different opportunities.

What do you know about our company?

Yet another way to gauge motivation is by looking at how much preparation you did into learning about the company. When I recruited for a magazine publisher, I would ask candidates to list their favorite magazines that we published. I wanted to see how well they knew our products. If your interest is genuine you will know about the company and its industry, so the only right answer to this question is A LOT (and then proceed to share).

Where else are you looking?

Finally, motivation and genuine interest can also be gauged by how seriously you’re focused on the company’s industry and competitors. If you’re interviewing at a bank, but also a manufacturer and a leisure company and an energy company…, then your interests are all over the place. If you are pursuing diverse types of jobs, keep it to yourself lest you seem scattered and undecided. Let the employer know that you have eyes only for the role at hand.

What questions do you have for me?

The interview is a two-way conversation. This is your chance to learn more about the company and the role. Prepare thoughtful questions in advance. Having questions shows that you’re interested and curious. Having intelligent questions shows that you’re prepared and ready to talk business.

In addition to general interview questions, you may be asked specific technical questions or case-based questions (the case style of interviewing is most popular with management consulting roles, though other industries use this line of questioning as well). Research the company in advance – what types of interviews do they conduct? Will you be taking a technical test? I have recruited for companies that gave coding tests or analytical tests or asked for writing samples. Prepare for all types of interviews you might encounter.

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